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Film Design

I watched the Big Lebowski for the second time ever. Honestly, I don’t like the movie. I didn’t like it the first time and a lot of my friends thought it was because I was just really tired, but this time I watched it bright and early in the morning and I just don’t get it. Anyways. Design Talk. That is why we are here, not for Mariah’s non-sensical movie reviews. So we were asked to answer these questions:

How does space help frame the design and style of noir in these films?

What design elements of noir are not specific to a particular time and place?

So First we have:

How does space help frame the design and style of noir in these films?

This is going to sound weird, but there is a lot of space in this movie. Everywhere. The screen is rarely full of something. You can always see the setting and the background of the situation. I found that to be interesting and probably contributed to the fact that I don’t like the movie. (I also just want to put a disclaimer here that I don’t like a lot of movies because I don’t have the patience to sit through anything without falling asleep). There were also points where it got up close and personal. I think it really helped keep the message of the story together. One time I really liked their use of space was in the bowling scene:

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This is one of the main images that come up when you search TBL. It really says a lot about the setting of the movie, the scene and the attitude.

Next question:

What design elements of noir are not specific to a particular time and place?

I think a lot of elements of noir can be used during multiple time periods (maybe everything except the black and white, which we sometimes see). Other than that, the use of shadows and lines is continuously used in film today.